Posts tagged ‘history’

White House Wine Quiz

White House Wine QuizWhich 2012 candidate is most likely to drink wine:

A. Obama
B. Biden
C. Romney
D. Ryan

This question – plus some illuminating notes about what these four candidates are likely to drink or not drink – is part of the 10-question White House Wine Quiz, available at the Wine Teasers website or direct at http://www.wineteasers.com/whitehousewinequiz.html.

The White House Wine Quiz is a lighthearted way to learn some fun facts about the role that wine plays in presidential politics and White House history.

Give it a shot and let us know what you think!

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October 28, 2012 at 11:12 am Leave a comment

The saucer-shaped Champagne glass was supposedly modeled on…

Repost:

The Wine Teasers is: The saucer-shaped Champagne glass was supposedly modeled on:

A: Marie Antoinette’s breast
B: The head of Dom Perignon’s infant son
C: A Spanish orange

Like all Wine Teasers questions, it doesn’t really matter if you know the answer, because each question has a GREAT BIG HINT.  You move ahead more quickly if you don’t need the hint, but it’s always there, ensuring that  Wine Teasers wine game is playable by even people who know little about wine.

Hint: Let them drink 34B!

Answer: A. This glass, called a “coupe,” is now out of fashion, since its wide surface area allows bubbles to dissipate. Much better is the long, thin tulip or flute-shaped glass. No word on what or who was the model for that.

That’s an actual question from Cork Jester’s Wine Teasers wine game, the most fun, zany, unintimidating wine game on the planet!

March 14, 2011 at 11:55 am Leave a comment

The saucer-shaped Champagne glass was supposedly modeled on…

The Wine Teasers is: The saucer-shaped Champagne glass was supposedly modeled on:

A: Marie Antoinette’s breast
B: The head of Dom Perignon’s infant son
C: A Spanish orange

Like all Wine Teasers questions, it doesn’t really matter if you know the answer, because each question has a GREAT BIG HINT.  You move ahead more quickly if you don’t need the hint, but it’s always there, ensuring that  Wine Teasers wine game is playable by even people who know little about wine.

Hint: Let them drink 34B!

Answer: A. This glass, called a “coupe,” is now out of fashion, since its wide surface area allows bubbles to dissipate. Much better is the long, thin tulip or flute-shaped glass. No word on what or who was the model for that.

That’s an actual question from Cork Jester’s Wine Teasers wine game, the most fun, zany, unintimidating wine game on the planet!

July 3, 2009 at 10:45 am Leave a comment

Mix medicines with wine? The ancients did it.

Source: Forbes. Pharoah’s Wine Jar Yields Medicinal Secrets. 04.12.09

And we always thought you were NOT supposed to mix alcohol and medicine! Little do we know. The ancient Egyptians did it and look where it got them. In fact, one guy, Scorpion I (must have been a wrestler), kept a few jars of his wine/medicine concoction in his tomb, just in case he woke up from the dead with a tummy ache.

From the article:

Sophisticated analysis of residues found in wine jars left in the tomb of Scorpion 1, perhaps the first pharaoh, shows that the wine had been steeped in herbs including balm, coriander, mint and sage, according to a report published in this week’s issue April 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

That tomb dates back to 3150 B.C., explained lead researcher Patrick E. McGovern, a senior research scientist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum Applied Science Center for Archaeology.

“This is the earliest evidence we have of herbs being added to wine,” McGovern said. “The earliest previous evidence we had was an alcoholic beverage from China from around 1200 B.C. That one had possibly wormwood or chrysanthemum in it, or a tree resin.”

— S.S.

April 14, 2009 at 6:34 am Leave a comment

Wine for breakfast? Tell your spouse there’s “historical precedent.”

Source: The Daily Telegraph (Australia). April 7, 2009 Tuesday. Ancient eating habits that went into boxes.  Troy Lennon

From the article:

IT IS often said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

For the Greeks, evidence in Homer shows that bread formed the basis of the early meal and even describes one in The Odyssey, consisting of meat from the day before with bread and wine. Olives and cheese were a favourite part of the ancient Greeks’ morning dish, but they also ate bread and fruit for breakfast. Instead of beer, they drank sweet wine, or dipped their bread into wine. They also liked tea made from herbs.

Ancient Romans usually ate breakfast when they awoke or at sunrise. For the ordinary poor Roman, this was a light repast of bread and water. Wealthier Romans also ate bread but with cheese, honey and fruit, accompanied by a drink of water or wine.

From medieval times to the 19th century, Europeans often drank ale or wine as part of breakfast, primarily because water supplies were not as reliable.

— S.S.

April 6, 2009 at 3:39 pm


What is Wine Teasers?

Wine Teasers Wine Game

Cork Jester's Wine Teasers wine game is a trendy, educational game that combines trivia, hints, chance, and even the occasional diabolical maneuver to provide a fun and unpretentious wine learning experience. Teams of players answer questions, discuss topics, loot virtual wines from each other, and have a fun, educational experience along the way. Wine Teasers’ motto, “The FUN way to learn wine,” describes the game perfectly

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